Archive for April, 2009

Observations: Services – April 13, 2009

Monday, April 13th, 2009

Standard disclaimer: don’t take from my selections, ordering, headlines, etc. any indications of the interests or plans of

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my employer (if you do, you’ll undoubtedly be disappointed when they don’t play out.)

Observations: Applications – April 13, 2009

Monday, April 13th, 2009

Standard disclaimer: don’t take from my selections, ordering, headlines, etc. any indications of the interests or plans of my employer (if you do, you’ll undoubtedly be disappointed when they don’t play out.)

Observations: Uses – April 7, 2009

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009

Standard disclaimer: don’t take from my selections, ordering, headlines, etc. any indications of the interests or plans of my employer (if you do, you’ll undoubtedly be disappointed when they don’t play out.)

Slowing Mobility? (in only one sense…)

Monday, April 6th, 2009

This afternoon I spoke to Eric Fultz, a Vice President, with Anyware Mobile Solutions. They have had tremendous success lately with their digiTICKET offer. It’s really a pretty cool proof point for the value created by mobilizing a previously paper-based process.

In a recent press release, one of Anyware’s customers provided the basic value proposition:

Mike Carter, Assistant Chief of Police for the Sands Springs Police Department stated, “This is a

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revolutionary step for our department. It will improve officer safety and driver inconvenience by minimizing the time a vehicle is stopped along the roadside to issue a ticket. It will also allow us to use our administrative resources more prudently and effectively.”

Eric walked me through the business case drivers that make eTicketing work for even a small police department:

  • Consider a police department with 10 officers who write 500 traffic tickets per month, with an average ticket representing $150 in revenue to the city.
  • Since the paper process typically involves a difficult 4-5 part carbon copy mess, the average stop takes 10-15 minutes. If there are multiple violations, each one requires a complete additional ticket, meaning that realistically, an officer won’t write more than 2 tickets per stop, even if there are more violations.
  • The paper tickets then need to be manually processed by clerks who have to decipher what was scrawled down by an officer in a dangerous situation. When they have trouble reading the tickets, they need to contact the officer who may not be able to even figure it out herself. A police department can easily lose 5% of their tickets this way. (Large police departments typically lose 15-20% because it’s not worth the effort to find the officer.)

Using an eTicketing solution, the process is dramatically improved:

  • The officer can scan in the driver’s license, automatically populating many of the fields in the ticket.
  • Violations can easily be added without having to reenter all of the information.
  • With wireless connectivity, once the license is scanned, it can be immediately and automatically checked against a database of outstanding warrants.
  • The driver can leave with a printed copy using a Bluetooth printer.
  • But the actual citation is electronically sent to the department’s/court’s Record Management System, bypassing the manual entry stage.

The results are significant:

  • 35% increase in tickets issued (both from capturing more violations per stop and being able to make more stops).
  • Tickets lost in processing drops virtually to zero.
  • Increased safety for the officers (less time standing on the shoulder) and increased convenience for the stopped drivers.

In this case, the police department investment can be completely paid back in 2-3 months – and can start creating incremental revenue and reducing processing expenses from that point forward. And given the state of municipal finances these days, what taxpayer can’t appreciate that?

Well, maybe the drivers whose “mobility” now must be constrained within the speed limit.

Enabling Technology: April 5, 2009

Sunday, April 5th, 2009

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the barriers to building mobility in are being obliterated week after week. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Social Grass at Seamless Enterprise

Saturday, April 4th, 2009

Another of my posts at Seamless Enterprise is worth referencing here: “What does Social Grass mean for the Enterprise?” The full post is probably worth reading, but here’s a shortened version:

In a recent interview with Telephony editor Kevin Fitchard, I introduced the concept of “social grass” as a component of how mobility will shape the next couple of decades. Even if you figured out what I meant by “social grass,” you probably struggled to see how it fit into a corporate environment.

Let me take a shot at clearing up the confusion on both fronts.

What’s relevant to me right now is based on many factors, some of which aren’t hard for a mobile device to determine – where am I, what time is it, who am I with, what’s on my calendar, etc. But more than anything, relevance is based on relationships – my relationships with people and companies.

The fact that Joe Smith serves on the board of Habitat for Humanity in Tulsa, Oklahoma may or may not be relevant to me. Even if I’m meeting with a Joe Smith for lunch, how will the systems that can prepare me for that lunch meeting determine whether it’s the same Joe Smith?

The term social grass combines three different concepts into a rich view of relationship determination. The first concept is the “social graph” which has been referenced heavily

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by players in the online social network space. The second concept is “grassroots” – the natural and spontaneous development of communities and their activities. The third concept is “grass weaving” – the intertwining of individual strands to create a strong, yet beautiful product.

This “social grass” – separate social graphs growing naturally and spontaneously in different places, woven together into a reliable indicator of my relationship with people and organizations – can connect me to the Joe Smith that I’m having lunch with, to his company, and to his community involvement with organizations like Habitat for Humanity. And can help me be prepared to talk about how every man, woman and child should have a decent, safe and affordable place to live.

Check out the full post!

My Predictions at Seamless Enterprise

Saturday, April 4th, 2009

I’ve been pretty busy lately, so haven’t had a chance to cross reference my posts at other forums.

Back in February I posted “Seven 2009 Business Telecom Predictions.” Check out the original post for all the details, but here’s the short summary:

  1. VoIP is dead. Long live AoIP!
  2. B’bye desk phone.
  3. IP surges ahead.
  4. Unified communications makes real inroads.
  5. Mobile broadband becomes standard configuration.
  6. Economic challenges drive mobile productivity.
  7. Outsourcing explodes.

Check it out!

Big Bell Dogma: February-March 2009

Saturday, April 4th, 2009

As we work to build mobility into every product, service, and process, our greatest inhibitor is the mindset represented by those who defend the tethering of products and processes to specific places. This mindset is fueled by the investments that have been made that establish power in the companies, departments, and individuals that stand in the way of mobilizing our lives and our businesses. These investments are not always in hard assets, but often

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are investments of time and experience to establish intellectual and relational assets. We should expect our assault on these ways to be defended to the death. Here are recent examples:

Recent Research: March 2009

Saturday, April 4th, 2009

Research is good. Free highlights from expensive research reports are great. Here are some recent headlines:

Observations: Uncategorized – April 3, 2009

Friday, April 3rd, 2009

Standard disclaimer: don’t take from my selections, ordering, headlines, etc. any indications of the interests or plans of my employer (if you do, you’ll undoubtedly be disappointed when they don’t play out.)