Archive for October, 2007

Enabling Technology: Week of 10/21/07

Friday, October 26th, 2007

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the barriers to building mobility in are being obliterated week after week. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Full list here.

Indicators: Week of 10/21/07

Thursday, October 25th, 2007

More and more, the world around us reflects the growing assumption of the law of mobility. Each week we will track indicators of Mobility’s growing importance in our businesses, our lives, and our society:

Full list here.

Capturing the Power: Week of 10/21/07

Wednesday, October 24th, 2007

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Complete list here

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Now playing: Josh Bates – Altar of God

Managing the Danger: Week of 10/21/07

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2007

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobility and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

Full list here.

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Now playing: Caedmon’s Call – Need Your Love

Top 10 Amazon Rankings

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

The Power of Mobility cracked the top 10 today at Amazon.com in three categories:

#5 in Books > Computers & Internet > Business & Culture > Manager’s Guides to Computing
#7 in Books > Professional & Technical > Engineering > Telecommunications
#8 in Books > Business & Investing > Industries & Professions > MIS

Thanks everyone!

GaGaGooogle on the Law of Mobility

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

GaGaGooogle has an interesting set of posts [1,2,3,4] on Google’s Mobile Strategy and on “The Laws.” I took notice because part 4 of the series argues convincingly the Law of Mobility. I recommend reading the whole post, but here are some quotes from the series:

Today Google is a pure money machine. The company has done a phenomenal job maximizing ad revenues. They also know they need to think, plan and executive for the long term. …

As Eric Schmit puts it:

Mobile, mobile, mobile — it’s probably the most wide open space out there right now.”

Google has benefited from several universal “laws” and will continue to benefit from them. Let’s take a look:

First, Metcalfe’s Law – which states that the value of the Internet increases with the square of the number of nodes or end users on the Internet. … Anyway, Google benefits since more people continue to connect and ultimately use Google’s search and other products. And the fact that their products are free and intuitive, only adds to their growth.

Second , Moore’s law – which states that every 18 months processing power (and chip density) double while the cost is cut in half. Google benefits in many ways because they can add more storage and processing power to their network for less money (also using less storage/rack space in their data centers). Simply put, their data centers are getting smaller (physical size) yet their capacity is growing.

Moore’s law also applies to handheld devices, which Google will leverage for it’s Gphone. The mobile revolution we are about to see is a result of Moore’s law. But there is also a third law that ties nicely into Google’s Mobile Strategy: the Law of Mobility.

The law states that the value of any product or service increases with its mobility, where the value of mobility is realized as availability and contextual relevance. From Russ McGuire’s (he coined the term) book The Power of Mobility:

… Bottom line for Google: More profit.

Mobile advertising will be twice as profitable as landline/PC-based ads. …

Erick Schmidt:

“[Mobile] ads are twice as profitable or more as non mobile ads because they are more personable” Bingo! Speaking of their KDDI partnership in Japan at the D conference.

Note that Chad makes a number of predictions in his posts that are not substantiated by official announcements by the referenced companies (including my employer). I think his conjecture is creative and wouldn’t be surprised if at least some of his predictions end up being on-target, but you’d be wrong if you thought my reference to his blog represented any kind of validation of his claims. Most of what he’s predicted I have no idea if its true or not, and some of what he’s written I’m pretty sure isn’t being pursued by the companies listed. But I look forward to keeping an eye on his creativity – we might all get some good ideas from him.

Converged Products: Week of 10/21/07

Monday, October 22nd, 2007

Bonus: Web Worker Daily identifies free services for your cellphone

The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence into the cellphone of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Complete list here.

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Now playing: Todd Agnew – Glorious Day

Enabling Technology: Week of 10/14/07

Friday, October 19th, 2007

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the barriers to building mobility in are being obliterated week after week. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Full list here.

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Now playing: Mitch McVicker – Freedom

Indicators: Week of 10/14/07

Thursday, October 18th, 2007

More and more, the world around us reflects the growing assumption of the law of mobility. Each week we will track indicators of Mobility’s growing importance in our businesses, our lives, and our society:

Full list here.

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Now playing: Blessid Union Of Souls – Lucky 2

MIT-Stanford VLAB – who “owns” your location?

Wednesday, October 17th, 2007

On Tuesday, I participated in an MIT-Stanford VLAB event focused on Location Awareness. The VLAB is a volunteer organization dedicated to promoting the growth and success of high-tech entrepreneurial ventures by connecting ideas, technology, and people. Gigi Wang, Hironmoy Paul, and team did a great job of putting together an excellent event.

Rajeev Chand, director of research for Rutberg & Company moderated the discussion. Sam Altman, CEO of Loopt kicked the session off with a fun overview of how location technology is fundamentally changing how we interact with our world.

My co-panelists were Michael Sharon, co-founder of Kamida (Kamida’s Socialight is featured in The Power of Mobility), Jodi Sherman Jahic, a principal at Voyager Capital, and Rick Withim, a business development manager for Nokia.

Bishop Auditorium at Stanford?s Graduate School of Business was packed for the event. Rajeev encouraged audience interaction, interspersing questions from the audience with the ones he had prepared.

Considering the panel participants, one of the more interesting questions of the evening was ?who owns my location information?? I argued that ?ownership? is the wrong concept since ?where someone is? does not fit the model for intellectual property ? information that can be owned. The real question is who can control how that information is used and who can make money from its use?

Carriers, device makers, and software developers may all have the opportunity to do something with information about location. Speaking from a carrier perspective, on one hand it is essential that we protect the privacy of the individual. On the other hand, if desired by the individual, we can enable new and powerful things to happen that create value for the individual.

I proposed that, if new value is created because the carrier enables it and because a software/service provider translates the location information into contextually-relevant value, then both should be able to make money in line with the value that was enabled/created.

As Sprint Nextel has demonstrated for years, being the most supportive and open to developers translates into value in many ways, most notably having the most valuable portfolio of location-based solutions for businesses has translated into market share leadership in business segments and loyalty from customers gaining value through LBS solutions. As we extend this openness and developer support in even more dimensions with our Xohm WiMax initiative, I imagine we will find even more ways that opening opportunities to others creates new value for us.

Thoughts? Reactions?