Archive for April, 2007

Capturing the Power: Week of 4/15/07

Wednesday, April 18th, 2007

Bonus: Nicholas Nova provides some great insights into capturing the power of mobility in gaming.

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Complete list here

Managing the Danger: Week of 4/15/07

Tuesday, April 17th, 2007

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobility and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

The complete list is here.

University Crisis Communications

Tuesday, April 17th, 2007

As a Virginia Tech alum and uncle to a current student, yesterday’s news was very sad and upsetting. Undoubtedly, the university leadership will come under increasing pressure about their failure to communicate the danger to students in a timely fashion.

A Washington Post story helped explain the challenges facing the university: “Virginia Tech was aware of the challenges involved in reaching students during a crisis, even during an age when it seems that everyone is wired. In August, on the first day of classes, an inmate escaped from jail, fatally shot a hospital guard and a sheriff’s deputy and then hid on campus, setting off a manhunt that shut down college grounds. The university posted updates on its Web site that day and sent out e-mails, but it took longer for the news to reach students who were commuting to school and were not online.

This isn’t a unique challenge, and reading the stories pouring out of Blacksburg, sadly, reminded me of a case study from my forthcoming book.

The good news is that mobility can potentially help avoid these types of tragedies in the future.

Montclair State University is the second largest, and fastest growing university in New Jersey. Like Virginia Tech and other universities, Montclair faced challenges communicating with students, many of whom commute from all around the New York City metro area.

Back in ancient history when I attended Virginia Tech, all dorm rooms had a telephone and all students anxiously checked their mail everyday. Today, at many universities, students “uninstall” their dorm room phones to make more room for posters (who needs a phone nailed to a wall when we all have cellphones?), paper mail goes ignored for weeks, and students choose webmail services over university provided accounts with limited storage. In this environment, how can a university possibly get an urgent message reliably out to all students, faculty, and staff?

Montclair’s solution is to provide everyone with a school-issued cellphone with special communications capabilities built in. Most students port their existing cellphone number to the new phone, but the university is able to maintain very accurate records of everyone’s numbers – making it easy to immediately get messages out as a phone call, a text message, or an e-mail directly to the student’s pocket.

The university worked with Sprint Nextel to ensure great coverage everywhere on campus and worked with Rave Wireless to implement applications on the phones that are particularly well suited to the campus environment. Those applications address the academic, social, and safety opportunities that exist on any campus. The implementation wasn’t without challenges – most notably, how do you drive adoption when most students show up with a phone they already know and love. You can read all about it when the book comes out.

But for now, we’re left stunned and praying that those suffering personal losses can know “the peace that passes understanding.”

Converged Products: Week of 4/15/07

Monday, April 16th, 2007

The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence into the cellphone of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Complete list here.

The Law of Mobility’s impact grows

Sunday, April 15th, 2007

Apparently, Viviane Reding of the European Commission referenced the Law in a speech last month in Hannover. (see page 4)

“Now I want to talk about some laws. These are not European laws – I will come to those later. They are not US laws either. They were never adopted by any Parliament. These are empirical laws of progress in the Information Society. You have heard of Moore’s Law: the doubling of computer power every 18 months without price increase. This has been a fundamental motor of productivity growth in the economy since the 1960s, but particularly in the digital economy since the
1980s.

“More recently, with the rise of the internet, Metcalfe’s Law has become crucial. It says: ‘the value of a network is the square of the number of users’. When a network doubles in size its value grows four fold. This is the driver of the network economy: connectivity. That is why social networking tools are so important because they create a ‘global market’ many times more valuable than the sum of individual national markets.

“Now we add McGuire’s Law: the value of product or service increases exponentially with mobility. We have fast cheap computer power, we have connectivity and we have mobility: one multiplier on top of another. Surely there are many new business models which will allow media firms to gain from all these new opportunities?”

The International Engineering Council‘s new Annual Review of Communications also includes a lengthy article on The Law of Mobility. (The table of contents is not yet up on their website, but I received a copy of the book last week.)

Finally, news about the forthcoming Power of Mobility book is reaching the blogosphere.  Geekzone‘s Mauricio Freitas gave the book prominent coverage yesterday.

Announcing: The Power of Mobility book

Saturday, April 14th, 2007

Power of Mobility CoverIf you’ve noticed that there’s been a scarcity of editorial content on this blog over the past several weeks, I have a good excuse. I have just submitted the final manuscript for a book on The Power of Mobility. The current plan is for the book to be published by John Wiley & Sons this fall.

The subtitle of the book is “How Your Business Can Compete and Win in the Next Technology Revolution” and the description on Wiley’s website describes the book this way: This book’s value will be measured by how well it helps readers look forward, to envision the Power of Mobility in their business, and to implement the steps required to turn vision into reality. What in any business today is stationary that, if it were mobile, would create tremendous value for customers? What steps must be taken to deliver that value and win customers’ hearts and wallets? These questions and more will be addressed in the core of the book, The Seven Steps to the Power of Mobility. This section will clearly define the specific thought processes and actions required for businesses determined to win in the new Mobility Age. Additionally, the book closes with specific examples of how companies have successfully followed these seven steps to redefine the rules of competition in their industries.

I’ll be sharing more about the book over the coming months!

Enabling Technology: Week of 4/08/07

Friday, April 13th, 2007

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the barriers to building mobility in are being obliterated week after week. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Full list here.

Indicators: Week of 4/08/07

Thursday, April 12th, 2007

More and more, the world around us reflects the growing assumption of the law of mobility. Each week we will track indicators of Mobility’s growing importance in our businesses, our lives, and our society:

Full list here.

Capturing the Power: Week of 4/08/07

Wednesday, April 11th, 2007

Bonus: Dean Bubley has a very interesting discussion this week on the value of making applications context-aware.

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Complete list here

Managing the Danger: Week of 4/08/07

Tuesday, April 10th, 2007

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobility and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

The complete list is here.