Archive for November, 2006

Converged Products: Week of 11/19/06

Monday, November 20th, 2006


The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence into the cellphone of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Complete list here.

Mobile Music: Thanksgiving Edition

Saturday, November 18th, 2006

As you know by now (hopefully you’ve only had to read about it and not experienced it personally), I’m one of those people you see driving down the highway belting out a good tune. From time to time I like to share with you my favorite tunes for going mobile. And in honor of Thanksgiving, what better way to express thankfulness than with some old time hymns? Take a listen and feel free to sing along:

The full list is here.

Enabling Technology: Week of 11/12/06

Friday, November 17th, 2006

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the barriers to building mobility in are being obliterated week after week. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Full list here.

Links

Thursday, November 16th, 2006

Today I participated in the Links Executive Summit in Santa Barbara.  The overall theme of the conference was content, and participants ranged from old world telecom players (e.g. AT&T), to those that sell to telcos (e.g. Cisco, HP, IBM), to those in the media value chain (e.g. Nellymoser, Real), and all the way to the President of the Houston Texans and the Chief Content Officer of Netflix.

Those last two provided some interesting perspectives that help illustrate the opportunities and challenges in the mobility revolution. 

As I’ve discussed before, context is a key component to the Mobility Revolution and this became a key theme throughout the day.  Location is one of the first ways that context is being built into mobile applications (e.g. Sprint’s announcement today with Microsoft of location-based search).  Location is particularly relevant to Jamey Rootes, President of the Houston Texans.  In Houston, the Texans have a growing and loyal fan base.  Under the structure of the NFL’s national/local structure, there are ways in which the Texans can build upon that valued base with unique content within their immediate vicinity, but not beyond.  Therefore, Jamey is very interested in progress being made to make mobile content contextually relevant to the Texans fans in Houston.

Another theme that continually came up throughout the day was about the challenges of finding the right content within the constraints of mobile devices.  Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer for Netflix provided a clear picture of the challenge.  Netflix offers nearly 70,000 titles.  Yesterday, 35,000 of those titles were ordered by customers, so there’s real activity across the entire portfolio.  How can Netflix customers wade through so many titles?  They find what they’ll enjoy, Ted claims, because of the Netflix personalization system based on the ratings that Netflix customers provide.  In effect, the titles that appeal to each customer rise to the top with amazing consistency.  For mobile content to overcome the navigation challenges, similar ways to intelligently simplify the process will need to emerge, undoubtedly helped along by the awareness of context.

Overall, some great discussions and congratulations to the Heavy Reading crowd for putting on a well-run event!

Indicators: Week of 11/12/06

Thursday, November 16th, 2006

More and more, the world around us reflects the growing assumption of the law of mobility. Each week we will track indicators of Mobility’s growing importance in our businesses, our lives, and our society:

Full list here.

Capturing the Power: Week of 11/12/06

Wednesday, November 15th, 2006

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Complete list here

Managing the Danger: Week of 11/12/06

Tuesday, November 14th, 2006

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobility and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

The complete list is here.

Converged Products: Week of 11/12/06

Monday, November 13th, 2006


The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence into the cellphone of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Complete list here.

Moto Buys Good. Palm Next?

Sunday, November 12th, 2006


Moto still gets it!

Motorola continues to bet big on the Mobility Revolution, demonstrating that they believe that mobility is fundamentally transforming how business will be done.

Back in September, Motorola bought Symbol Technologies, giving the company a solid move into the space of automating traditionally paper-based processes with mobility. But the first place that most businesses are catching hold of mobility is in mobile e-mail, and this week Motorola announced the acquisition of Good Technology, a leading provider of e-mail mobility software.

Most of the commentary on the Good deal focuses on positioning Motorola to take share from Research In Motion (RIM), the maker of market leading Blackberry products. However, the combination of Good and Motorola’s other product lines is actually much more interesting. Unlike RIM, especially with the Symbol deal, Motorola has a portfolio that stretches well beyond the needs of corporate geeks addicted to mobile e-mail.

Unlike RIM, Motorola has a very solid position in the consumer space. Good’s usability innovations may help increase the adoption of consumer mobile e-mail as Motorola integrates this usability into their consumer devices. And with the Symbol acquisition, Motorola can turn the same trick with on-the-go workers beyond the halls of the corporate headquarters.

However, Motorola is still relatively weak in exactly the segments where Good and RIM have been strong – enabling white collar office workers to take their desk-bound tasks with them. Motorola’s launch of the Q smartphone earlier this year was an attempt to move into this space, but hasn’t yet taken over the market from RIM’s Blackberries or Palm’s Treos. Good’s software has already been available on the Q, so buying the supplier isn’t likely to magically do the trick.

Which brings us to some pure, unfounded speculation. Given Motorola’s aggressive buying spree, it’s natural to ask what’s next. How about Palm? Palm’s stock has been trading down this year, making it affordable and maybe even attractive. Palm’s products are a great complement to both Moto’s consumer portfolio and Symbol’s more hard working devices. And the combination of Good and Treo has been a pretty popular combination in the market.

Maybe Motorola’s finished with Christmas shopping. Or maybe they’re just getting started.

In any case, they clearly have their eyes set on the value being created as the Mobility Revolution transforms the business workplace!

Enabling Technology: Week of 11/5/06

Friday, November 10th, 2006

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the barriers to building mobility in are being obliterated week after week. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Full list here.