Archive for June, 2006

Converged Products: Week of 6/25/06

Friday, June 30th, 2006

The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products into the cellphone. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Mobile Music: Summer Roadmusic Edition

Tuesday, June 27th, 2006

Going mobile in the summer requires music with a strong enough bassline to be heard with the windows down and a catchy enough tune to make you want to bop your head as you sing along (sending the sweat droplets flying…):

Indicators: Week of 6/18/06

Sunday, June 25th, 2006

A new topic area in the Law of Mobility, we will track indicators of Mobility’s growing importance in our businesses, our lives, and our society:

Enabling Technology: Week of 6/18/06

Sunday, June 25th, 2006

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the cost of adding mobility into products is falling, making it a no-brainer for mobility to be built into everything. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Capturing the Power: Week of 6/18/06

Saturday, June 24th, 2006

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Managing the Danger: Week of 6/18/06

Saturday, June 24th, 2006

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobility and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

Layer 10

Friday, June 23rd, 2006

You may have been missing some of the most exciting news in mobility because it’s happening (or rather not happening) in IEEE standards committees.  Qualcomm, Intel, Motorola and others are battling over the 802.20 standard for broadband wireless technologies.

However, the debates aren’t over technical merits, but rather over politics.  It’s rather interesting that the 802.20 standards seemed stalled for years with some claiming that Qualcomm was the main inhibitor.  You see, the 802.20 standards seemed to be heading towards using technology by a startup spun-out from Lucent.  That company, Flarion Technologies, was acquired by Qualcomm last year, and what do you know, all of a sudden the standards proceedings magically picked up pace again.

Well now Intel and friends are implying that the chairman of the 802.20 group is on Qualcomm’s payroll and therefore, the Flarion technology is getting an unfair level of attention.

Of course the real problem goes back to the Ten Layer Stack.  As you may recall, most technologists focus on the 7 technology layers defined in the OSI reference model.  However, in reality, technology decisions often have almost nothing to do with technology – instead they come down to marketing, finance, and politics.

With Intel clearly focused on the success of WiMax (802.16 standards) as an alternative to 802.20 technologies, I don’t suppose Intel’s actions have anything to do with the fact they have financial gains at risk if the 802.20 standards get approved too quickly.  No, couldn’t be… 

And I always thought standards committees were boring…

 

Converged Products: Week of 6/18/06

Friday, June 23rd, 2006

The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products into the cellphone. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Lessons for Mobility

Wednesday, June 21st, 2006

Techdirt has a great article this week contrasting people’s attraction to Wi-Fi enabled devices with people’s disdain for their cellular devices (seemingly largely driven by their dissatisfaction with their cellular carriers).

What are the lessons for those believing in the revolutionary power of mobility?

I tend to think it has to do with the direction of integration…  A laptop maker who builds mobility (in the form of WiFi) into their laptop, still has a great laptop but now the value is increased by mobility.  A wireless company that sells a voice plan, but then tries to build laptop functionality into a cellphone has a cellphone that’s slightly improved, but isn’t a very good laptop.

Building mobility into products creates significant incremental value.

Converging a capability into my mobile device creates some value, in that now I have that capability everywhere I go, but if the compromises are too great, mostly it can create frustration.

Enabling Technology: Week of 6/11/06

Sunday, June 18th, 2006

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the cost of adding mobility into products is falling, making it a no-brainer for mobility to be built into everything. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen: