Archive for May, 2006

Capturing the Power: Week of 5/14/06

Saturday, May 20th, 2006

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Managing the Danger: Week of 5/14/06

Saturday, May 20th, 2006

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobility and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

Converged Products: Week of 5/14/06

Friday, May 19th, 2006

The most convenient way that mobility is getting built into products is through the convergence of capabilities that previously existed as standalone products into the cellphone. That way, those products are now with you and available for your use whenever you need them wherever you go.

Mobile Music: Hayfever Edition

Thursday, May 18th, 2006

In honor of our annual bout with pollen, this month’s collection of music “great for going mobile” features some of my favorite “grassroots” artists. Enjoy!

Why the Mobility Age is Good for Intel

Wednesday, May 17th, 2006

An article at Morningstar provides a telling indicator of what the mobility age means for chip companies like Texas Instruments and Intel.  The article states that chips for cellphones now outpace chips for computers.

If you think about it, the PC age put Intel on the map.  Companies like IBM that thought the single-vendor integrated system was the winning model in the industry were the big losers in the PC era while companies like Intel and Microsoft that provided key components and companies like Dell and Compaq that integrated together components from different suppliers were the big winners.

In the Internet age, Microsoft has struggled a bit because, just as the PC era knocked the single-vendor system model off the pedestal, the Internet era shattered the single-vendor software model.  Instead, Google has been the big winner with its focus on enabling “smash-ups” that integrate capabilities from different innovation leaders into customized solutions.  But the biggest losers have probably been companies like AT&T and MCI (R.I.P.) because the traditional network model has really been dismantled, with intelligence moving out of the core of the network and to the edge where lots of innovation can happen.  But the Internet era has still been all goodness for Intel, because all that innovation at the edge is running on servers, many of which consume Intel processors.

Now, as we move into the Mobility age, we wait to see who the big winners and big losers will be, but we can count on chip makers like Intel continuing to be winners as mobility (requiring chips) gets built into all products and all processes.

New Law of Mobility article in Telephony

Monday, May 15th, 2006

A new article on the Law of Mobility is available on the website of Telephony magazine:

Enabling Technology: Week of 5/7/06

Sunday, May 14th, 2006

The Law of Mobility talks about value increasing with mobility. The impact of this law is being felt because the cost of adding mobility into products is falling, making it a no-brainer for mobility to be built into everything. Here are examples of technology advances enabling this to happen:

Capturing the Power: Week of 5/7/06

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

Mobility is a wonderful thing. As mobility gets built into all products and services, businesses need to learn how to both capture the power of mobility and manage the dangers introduced through mobility. Here are some examples of how the power of mobility is being applied to create competitive advantage:

Managing the Danger: Week of 5/7/06

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

In order to be winners in the new mobile era, businesses will not only need to capture the power of mobility, but also manage the danger. Highlighted below are recent examples of the danger of mobiliity and how some firms are beginning to manage it:

Are you still funding the Spanish-American War?

Saturday, May 13th, 2006

I stole the title of this post from an article by the same name by Steve Kroening at Business Reform.  The article is short and to the point and calls out one of the challenges to mobility being built into everything – the government’s desire to pile taxes on anything that looks or smells like “telecommunications” (whatever that means these days).

Steve points to MyWireless.org as one place you can cast your vote and join the battle to keep taxes from killing the potential for mobility to increase value in our products, our businesses, and our lives.